Student Union

Levy: Loaded Ladle

The board wants to increase serving days from three to four days per week

Levy: Loaded Ladle photo by : Mira Chiasson
written by Sabina Wex
March 10, 2017 11:30 am

The Loaded Ladle wants to raise their levy from $3 per semester to $4.50 per semester for full-time students. The Loaded Ladle board told the Gazette more about what they’ve done this year and why they feel they deserve the levy.

Why does the Loaded Ladle feels this increase is deserved?

We have recently moved into a brand new cooking and serving space, as part of the SUB Renovations, and we are so excited about it! We want to meet the increased demand for our food, programming, and political work and grow into our new space. Our last levy increase was in 2012, when students voted to raise us from $1 to $3 per semester. The 2017 levy increase would support our growth until 2020.

What has the Loaded Ladle achieved this year?

Our three weekly servings are our most salient marker of success. We serve, on average, 200 people, three days per week with these servings. We’ve also been busy with solidarity servings in the community and on campus.

On the programming side, we have a monthly book club which meets to talk about food justice materials. Our annual workshop series in October, To The Root in October, was the most successful year we’ve had so far. Currently, we are running our annual cooking competition, Iron Ladle, which is always a big hit with teams and the line-up.

Finally, we’ve introduced a new paid position to the Ladle, Sexton Engagement Coordinator, who has been working to increase our presence on Sexton and student engagement with the Ladle on Sexton campus.

What does the Loaded Ladle plan to do with the money?

We plan to increase our serving days from three to four days per week, increase our capacity for community and solidarity servings, and increase programming throughout the year. In general, we plan to grow into our expanded space.

What is your favourite thing about the Loaded Ladle?

So many things! The collective work and engagement of people, working towards a common goal is something the Ladle does so well. We all work together to make and serve daily meals and keep the kitchen clean, so many people come together to keep the Ladle running well as a society and co-operative. The Ladle really shows the truth and power in “many hands make light work.” It’s always exciting when people are engaged with the political side of the Ladle: talking about food on campus and why corporations don’t belong in the SUB, why prisoner justice and food justice are so closely linked. Food brings people together and so does the Ladle.