Why I don’t work out and why it’s stopping you too

Break that cycle of laziness

Why I don’t work out and why it’s stopping you too
written by Matt Stickland
November 23, 2016 12:08 pm

We’ve all done it. We’re tagged in a picture and realize that we may be fatter than we think. This requires immediate action. Tomorrow it starts: gym/running/whatever, life forever changes tomorrow. A month later we’re tagged in a picture and realize that we may be fatter than we think. This requires immediate action. The cycle continues. If I deeply truly want to be in better shape, which I do, why can’t I get my shit together?

It’s simple really: we’re coming at the question wrong. There are 24 hours in a day. Right now whatever it is you do with your time you do because you want to do it. For most people that looks something like sleeping for eight(ish) hours, working for eight(ish) hours, cleaning, eating, commuting, etc. Your well-deserved downtime is spent playing video games, reading, binge-watching or whatever it is you do. Where is working out going to fit?

Putting a workout into your day isn’t about simply adding it to what you already do. It’s a game of subtraction: what are you going to take away? What are you going to lose? Most people don’t consider this as part of their plan.

I’ll just run before work! The run takes half an hour, you still need to feed yourself in the morning, you can’t skip a shower if you’ve run, you can’t wake up naked and bolt out the door. Call the run an hour with everything included. Which means getting up an hour earlier. You’ve been sleeping that extra hour up until this point because you’ve needed it. Which means going to bed an hour earlier. Which means not watching the next Luke Cage even though it ended on a cliffhanger. But you’re comfortable right now so you let Netflix auto-play the next episode and promise yourself you’ll get up anyways and just be tired. This lasts for three days. You can’t just take out an hour of sleep. You’re back to not running again.

I realized that this was the issue in large part thanks to Jason Pargin and the Cracked podcast. I had decided that I wanted to be a better writer but just wasn’t writing and couldn’t figure out why. I came to realize that my time spent playing video games was the time I needed to make into writing time. Instead of just adding writing, I had to first subtract video-game playing. I needed to make the conscious decision to eliminate something and stick to that. Once you eliminate something it’s very easy to use that new free time to do the thing you want.

So why don’t I work out? I’ve already made the elimination of some down time to write instead. I’m not currently willing to eliminate another hour of binge-watching to exercise. I’d probably look better naked if I did, but Luke Cage already looks good with his shirt off so…

Write down the five things you want to do. Write down the five things that you do the most of, not including sleep or work. Don’t lie, well I mean you can, but this list is for you so who are you really lying to? Compare those lists. You need to eliminate time from the list of things you currently do, to make room for the things you want. Do that and you’ll reach your goals.

If not you’ll be tagged in a picture and realize that you may be fatter than you think. This requires immediate action. Tomorrow it starts: gym/running/whatever, life forever changes tomorrow. A month later you’re tagged in a picture and realize that you may be fatter than you think. This requires immediate action.