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Blood and Guts and Music

The Halifax Battle of the Bands tore through the T Room

Six local bands fought to the bloody end for a cash prize and chance to play at the World Curling Championship • • • Photo by Mat Wilush
Six local bands fought to the bloody end for a cash prize and chance to play at the World Curling Championship • • • Photo by Mat Wilush

Last Thursday, six local bands fought to the bloody end for a cash prize and chance to play at the World Curling Championship – which is being held in Halifax from March 28 to April 5. Each band – representing a wide swath of musical talent, from hair-metal inspired rock to acoustic R&B – brought all they could muster to the T-Room on Sexton Campus. Guitar strings clashed against drum sticks; Mandolin necks snapped against keyboards. Sweat trickled and fingers ached. The fog of battle lifted and three bands walked out.

While each band brought something unique, ultimately it came down to the panel of three judges to determine the victors.

Glass Atlas, an electric funk fest, came out in third. Rubber Band, the aforementioned hair-metallers, took second place. First place winners Dead Last got some of the crowd dancing to their ecstatic beat – reminiscent of pop-punk rap outfit Gym Class Heroes.

The fate of the three victors was then left to the audience – ballots were provided at the door, and the band with the highest number of votes would move on to finals in March.

A second group of bands is set to play Feb. 26 at a yet-to-be-determined venue, and registration is still open. It could be time to take your band out of the living room and into the spotlight. The grand prize – cash and a performance at the WORLD CURLING CHAMPIONSHIP – could be your shot at greatness.

That is, if you can survive the battle.

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Mat Wilush
Mat Wilush
Mat Wilush once went to see Agent Orange on the outskirts of Toronto, where the beer was salty and drunken teenagers took turns sitting in a prop electric chair. The music had aged poorly. A mohawk’d middle-ager danced through the first couple songs, but quickly tired out. There just isn’t much room for surf rock in the world anymore. What next? Mat Wilush wants to know. Mat is the Gazette's Arts Editor. Follow him on Twitter at @wilushwho and email him at arts@dalgazette.com.
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