Fall reads

The fall season can mean a lot of things to different people. Regardless of personal feelings, its shorter days and brisker winds make it a great time to start a new book.   The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde (1890)  First published in 1890, this classic is the perfect book to kick off spooky season. The Picture…

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Dal alumna publishes horror story collection

Lauren Messervey, a Dalhousie University alumna, has found success in the horror genre. In an interview with the Dalhousie Gazette, she talks about the writing process, self-publishing and her upcoming projects.   Dalhousie alumna with a story  Messervey graduated from Dal with a bachelor of arts in theatre with a focus on acting. While her passion for the stage propelled…

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Poetry primer to feed the soul

If poetry feeds the soul, Nova Scotians are truly blessed. The province is home to some of the country’s most influential Black writers including Afua Cooper, Abena Beloved Green, Maxine Tynes and George Elliott Clarke.   With the winter study break looming, many students seek scholarly and leisure reading. It is impossible to cover every talented Black poet in Nova Scotia, but here are some names to look for.   Gloria Ann Wesley …

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Life after Dal: A diaper dilemma

Writing a children’s book can be a lot of fun, especially when you’re the mother of two infants. This was the case for Sarabeth Holden: a Dalhousie University alumna and author of the recently published picture book Please Don’t Change My Diaper.   Holden based the book, illustrated by Emma Pederson, on her three-year-old son Raymond. The…

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Discovering the truth of our hearts

Editor’s note: This article contains many spoilers for the 2020 novel In Five Years.  In Five Years by Rebecca Searle is a novel about confronting the reality of your life and finding the bravery to change it amidst grief, hope and loss.  The plot  In Five Years follows the story of Dannie, a high-achieving lawyer in New York…

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The blacksmiths of Nova Scotia

Frank Smith’s new novel What Once Was Lost: The Blacksmith’s Art in Nova Scotia refutes the idea that blacksmithing is archaic, obsolete and alive only in demonstrations by burly men at historic sites.  Discovering the community  Frank is a Dalhousie University professor of histology, a subfield of anatomy interested in the microscopic structure of tissue. He teaches in…

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Read This: The Hour of the Star

This summer we read and loved The Hour of the Star by one of Brazil’s most brilliant novelists: Clarice Lispector. We like to recommend books you can read during your studies, and luckily, this month’s read is only 77 pages! Although it’s short, it’s sure to have an impact.  About the author  Lispector spent the final years of her life writing The…

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