Opinions

Christmas time as a university student  

How the holiday changes from childhood to young adulthood  

Christmas time as a university student   photo by : Alexandra Sweny
Photo by Alexandra Sweny.
written by Laura Hardy
November 30, 2017 12:31 pm

Hearing those sleigh bells ring-ting-tingling, just doesn’t have the same feeling  when looking at a sad bank account  as when the presents came from Santa.  

Christmas is one of those things you don’t want to change;  but eventually it does.   

It’s not the same as when you were a  kid  wearing footy  pyjamas and  running down the stairs to see what Santa left under the tree.  

As a child, waiting to see what Santa was going to bring was the best part. The curiosity would seep through every moment and action of the holiday season. The anticipation of ripping open presents pulsating through every child’s heartbeat.  

Carols, light-lined trees, family, and thoughtful gifts are some of the things people think of when the word ”Christmas” comes up.  

It’s a joyous time of year.   

As a person gets older, perspectives can start to change. Christmas is still a  favourite, but it’s not all about the presents and the morning of anymore.  

Christmas for a university student can be stressful, but  also  the best time of year.  

Presents just never seem good enough.   

There’s a meme that circulates every year  in  students  social circles: it  says  Christmas  shopping is hard because  your  mom deserves an island and all that  you can  afford  is a candle.  

This is so accurate with all  my  family members and friends.  

Even that candle  could  set a person back  by  $20. Multiply that by the ten, 15, or 20 people you have to buy for.   

Good luck.  

This can feel exacerbated if you’re the youngest child in a large family where others are buying extravagant gifts, but it’s just not feasible when you’re a university student.  

Talk about guilt. It’s always been that presents were unequal, but now, as university students, we are supposed to be young adults. Key word being: adult. Meaning that we should be able to afford to buy a nice present for our parents.   

Jokes on us. (Them?) That won’t happen until we’re 35 and finally just finishing paying off that last $1,000 of student loans.  

It sucks not being able to give the gift that a person deserves. The perfect one you know is just for them – just not in a student’s price range.  

But the holiday time – not just the gift giving part – it’s changed for different reasons.  

Christmas as an adult isn’t just cookies, love, and happiness; it’s the time that people miss their loved ones who are no longer here the most. It changes the atmosphere.  

Christmas traditions change or disappear and get togethers just don’t feel whole anymore.  

It can be hard to try and celebrate such a happy and joyous time of the year when those who have always been a part of the tree trimming, snowman making, Christmas baking fun, are now only memories.  

But, Christmas is the only time in the school year where a student can actually relax.   

Not the “I have five things do next week but I’m going to take the night off” kind of relaxing.   

Complete relaxation. It’s blissful in itself.  

There’s also the aspect of being able to actually spend time with loved ones. After having four essays, five exams and an oral presentation, getting to decorate some cookies with family feels like God himself sent those delicious pieces of sugary happiness.  

Happy Holidays, Dalhousie University.