King’s Galley drops anchor in the HMCS King’s Wardroom

Gazette LogoEditor’s Note: In the original version of this article, the King’s Galley was referred to as the HMCS Galley. This is not the actual name of the establishment and the Gazette regrets this error. The online version of this article reflects these changes.

The University of King’s College hopes to attract students to dine on campus with a brand new selection of healthy food options and local coffees at their completely redone canteen.

Located in the HMCS King’s Wardroom in the Arts and Administration Building, it is aptly named the King’s Galley. ‘The Galley’ is internally operated by King’s through Local Source, a local food supplier. Local Source collects produce and meat from farms around Halifax and Eastern Canada.

Now finishing its third week of operation, assistant manager Simon Kaplan says the feedback has been very positive. With new food services being considered in the Student Union Building (SUB) many people are looking for healthier and alternative options.

Gavin Jardine, the incoming VP (student life), says as a vegetarian he recognizes the need for food alternatives on Dalhousie’s Studley campus. “There is barely anything I get to eat except a veggie sub,” he says.

This is something the King’s Galley has done well. They offer vegan, vegetarian and gluten free options.

The SUB food services are currently operated by Sodexo. The business operates a few franchises such as Tim Hortons and Booster Juice, but also the Union Market, which serves mostly fast food. When the DSU changes the food services in the SUB there are healthier alternatives they are considering.

The DSU has been working on putting new food in the SUB for the past two years. With the Sodexo contract expiring this summer, Chris Saulnier, current DSU president, is looking for new innovative ways to do food in the SUB.

Saulnier says the DSU wants to take a more hands-on role with the food services. He recognizes there should be a higher quality of food in the SUB and as students, “we are concerned with where food comes from.”

The DSU is currently accepting proposals for food. Council will make a decision April 18. Saulnier confirms there will be noticeable changes to the food in the SUB starting in September, but any major renovations will be held off until 2013.

The incoming DSU executive does not have a say in what company gets chosen or what the contract will look like, but Jardine recognizes that “whatever happens, food will be the biggest issue for the DSU next year.”

Saulnier says the DSU wants local, healthy and affordable food. The King’s canteen has embraced this idea. The King’s Galley offers Java Blend Coffee, a local company, for $1.50, quinoa or bean salad for $3.75, and a lunch special of homemade grilled cheese sandwiches with soup for $6.

It was easier for King’s to support a self-operated canteen because they are a much smaller campus, says Kaplan. Kaplan believes “with the amount of foot traffic through the SUB it would be hard to become self-operated.”

However, Saulnier says they have built their business plan around the self-operated idea as well.

“We want to be more involved,” he says, “whether that means going into a joint contract or paying a manager’s fee.”

Saulnier says all three Sodexo-owned franchises in the SUB may disappear in the coming years. Don’t fret, though; the Tim Hortons isn’t going anywhere, says Jardine with a laugh.

“We realize there would be a riot if the Tim Hortons disappeared.”

The University of King’s College hopes to attract students to dine on campus with a brand new selection of healthy food options and local coffees at their completely redone canteen.

Located in the HMCS Wardroom in the Arts and Administration Building, it is aptly named the HMCS Galley. ‘The Galley’ is internally operated by King’s through Local Source, a local food supplier. Local Source collects produce and meat from farms around Halifax and Eastern Canada.

Now finishing its third week of operation, assistant manager Simon Kaplan says the feedback has been very positive. With new food services being considered in the Student Union Building (SUB) many people are looking for healthier and alternative options.

Gavin Jardine, the incoming VP (student life), says as a vegetarian he recognizes the need for food alternatives on Dalhousie’s Studley campus. “There is barely anything I get to eat except a veggie sub,” he says.

This is something the HMCS Galley has done well. They offer vegan, vegetarian and gluten free options.

The SUB food services are currently operated by Sodexo. The business operates a few franchises such as Tim Hortons and Booster Juice, but also the Union Market, which serves mostly fast food. When the DSU changes the food services in the SUB there are healthier alternatives they are considering.

The DSU has been working on putting new food in the SUB for the past two years. With the Sodexo contract expiring this summer, Chris Saulnier, current DSU president, is looking for new innovative ways to do food in the SUB.

Saulnier says the DSU wants to take a more hands-on role with the food services. He recognizes there should be a higher quality of food in the SUB and as students, “we are concerned with where food comes from.”

The DSU is currently accepting proposals for food. Council will make a decision April 18. Saulnier confirms there will be noticeable changes to the food in the SUB starting in September, but any major renovations will be held off until 2013.

The incoming DSU executive does not have a say in what company gets chosen or what the contract will look like, but Jardine recognizes that “whatever happens, food will be the biggest issue for the DSU next year.”

Saulnier says the DSU wants local, healthy and affordable food. The King’s canteen has embraced this idea. The HMCS Galley offers Java Blend Coffee, a local company, for $1.50, quinoa or bean salad for $3.75, and a lunch special of homemade grilled cheese sandwiches with soup for $6.

It was easier for King’s to support a self-operated canteen because they are a much smaller campus, says Kaplan. Kaplan believes “with the amount of foot traffic through the SUB it would be hard to become self-operated.”

However, Saulnier says they have built their business plan around the self-operated idea as well.

“We want to be more involved,” he says, “whether that means going into a joint contract or paying a manager’s fee.”

Saulnier says all three Sodexo-owned franchises in the SUB may disappear in the coming years. Don’t fret, though; the Tim Hortons isn’t going anywhere, says Jardine with a laugh.

“We realize there would be a riot if the Tim Hortons disappeared.”

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