Letter from the editor: Uncharacteristic optimism

Dear Reader, 

Once a year (and only once a year), the editors at the Dalhousie Gazette encourage their writers to make stuff up. Why? It’s the satire issue. These stories are exclusively in print, so you won’t find them on our website. 

Of course, the date of this issue was planned months ago, but the timing now seems odd. Tragedy is weighing heavily on many of our minds. As I write this, I’m staring out a plane window during a Montreal layover, waiting to go home to Halifax. Please, god, don’t let this snow pick up beyond a flurry. Damn, someone’s sat beside me. Won’t be able to nap now. Then I must remind myself how small my problems are in the grand scheme of things. It’s a privilege to be able to shut out the news, as I did for most of my MFA residency in Toronto last week. 

For 20 pages, I invite you to do just that. Take a step out of reality. I want these stories to make you laugh, think, and even roll your eyes. If you can, grant yourself some levity. You probably deserve it. 

Before we dive into the humour, however, I also want to extend my thanks to the Ubyssey, the University of British Columbia’s student newspaper. Every year, the Canadian University Press’ national conference (known as NASH) is hosted by a different campus paper in a different city. This time around, student journalists from across the country gathered in Vancouver. Unfortunately, I’ve never had the pleasure of attending NASH myself, but the Gazette sent News editor Karla Renic and Opinions editor Isabel Buckmaster to take in the weekend’s events from Jan. 9-12. This year’s theme was “Empower,” and attendees had the chance to listen to lectures about reporting on hate groups, business reporting, satire (what a coincidence!) and more. Alex Nguyen, Thea Udwadia and Charlotte Alden helmed the organization of the event, which is no small feat in and of itself—but I’m guessing it was extra tough on top of school and running a paper. Thank you, thank you, thank you. 

NASH is a truly special and valuable event. I hope it continues for many years. This industry often feels bleak, but it’s hard to be pessimistic when I see young journalists gather for the sake of learning. Y’all fill me with uncharacteristic optimism. And so do you, my wonderful reader.

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Rebecca Dingwell

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