Posts Tagged ‘Review’

What’s hip about “Mogul” the podcast

Mogul podcast is a six-part podcast about a guy you’ve never heard of who’s responsible for a lot of the names in hip hop that you’ve heard of. In Mogul, Reggie Ossé, also known as “Combat Jack,” explores the life and times of Chris Lighty who died by a self-inflicted gunshot wound in 2012. Lighty…

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A new era for the Fountain School of Performing Arts

DISCLAIMER: Lara Lewis is a recent graduate of the Fountain School of Performing Arts and keeps personal relationships with much of the cast and creative team. Philip Akin’s direction of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream is, simply, a triumph of modern theatre. In short, it is everything magical and beautiful that FSPA has the potential…

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Theatre review: Stones in His Pockets

The trio made of director Dayna Tekatch and actors Christian Murray and Rhys Bevan-John return to Neptune with Stones in His Pockets. The three teamed up last year for the acclaimed The 39 Steps. Unfortunately, despite an entertaining show, lightning did not strike twice with this production. Stones in His Pockets, which opened on Friday,…

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Theater Review: Constellations

The latest venture from Keep Good Theatre Company is a highly intellectual emotional rollercoaster. Constellations, written by Nick Payne, is directed by Laura Vingoe-Cramandstars, Jeff Schwager and Leslie Smith in an intimate two-person play. With a minimalist set and a running time of only 60 minutes, Constellations successfully rides the fine line of digestible and…

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Stubbornly still in business

There are many great paradoxes of our time: What happens when Pinocchio says “my nose will grow?” Why can Mario smash his head off concrete blocks, but dies when he touches a turtle? If I try and lose a game and succeed, did I win? And why is the Stubborn Goat still in business? On…

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Theatre Review: “The FEAR Project”

When a show promises to be a “new musical creation” based upon cultural fears such as June bugs, terrorists, and anal sex, it has a lot to live up to. Writers and performers Kristi Anderson and Garry Williams seem unfathomably cognizant of the weight they hold on their shoulders and keep the promise that the…

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Seeing the invisible

Liz Marshall: Canadian activist and filmmaker. (Press photo)

Award-winning Canadian filmmaker Liz Marshall spoke at a screening of her latest film, The Ghosts in Our Machine, last weekend in the McCain building. The World Society for the Protection of Animals’s (WSPA) Dalhousie branch organized the free event and facilitated an hour-long Q-and-A session with Marshall. Toronto-based Marshall has made 11 documentaries about various…

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Why aren’t you playing: Antichamber

  I’ve rewritten this review a dozen times, now. I can’t find words for my experience with Antichamber–not because it was stupendous or too beautiful to describe, but simply because I cannot rightly think of an experience like it. It is truly unique. Antichamber is a conundrum wrapped in a metaphorical enigma, tossed into an allegorical…

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A joy to hold

Another day, another fabulous p-book (that’s publisher-speak for “printed book”) proving the continuing relevance of print medium releases on the Canadian literary market. Readers, this is one for the book(shelve)s. Over 100 years after its first publication in 1912, Stephen Leacock’s Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town should still be required reading for anyone growing up…

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Why aren’t you playing: The Stanley Parable

I once thought of myself as rather clever. I had managed to get myself on top of one of the desks in the office area just outside Stanley’s cubicle. The narrator had just introduced the game for the billionth time. But not this time, no! I had climbed a chair, mounted a desk, and vaulted…

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